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DDC Community Grants - types of groups

This page outlines the different types of organisation/groups that are listed in our application form. Please use this to help identify which boxes you should tick.

Types of Groups
Organisation TypeDescription
Registered Charity

This refers to a particular type of legal structure that can be either a Charitable Company or a Charitable Trust.

A Trust would not have members but is run by a small group of people known as the Board of Trustees. If a Trust has an income of over £5,000 a year we would expect it to be registered with the Charity Commission.

A Company has its own legal identity over and above its members. This allows it to own land, enter into contracts and employ people. It is usually run by a small group of Directors but can still have a wider membership. We would expect a Charitable Company to be Registered with both Companies House and the Charity Commission.

Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO)

This refers to a particular type of legal structure.

A CIO is a type of Charity that is Incorporated and is also registered with the Charity Commission but it does not have to confirm to the same level of accounting and reporting of a Charitable Company. A CIO can still lease or own land, enter in contracts and employ people.

Community Interest Company (CIC)

This refers to a particular type of legal structure.

A CIC is a limited company with special features to ensure that it works for the benefit of the community. However whereas Charitable Structures have to have Charitable Aims a CIC can be set up for any purpose (within reason). The level of regulation for CIC's is quite light but we would expect them to be registered with Companies House as a Limited Company and also through the Office of the regulator of Community Interest Companies.

Co-operative/ Industrial & Provident Society (IPS)

These can have a number of different legal structures.

Essentially these are organisations that are owned and democratically controlled by their members. Usually, these are set up as a type of Company and are registered with Companies House. Usually, Co-ops generate a surplus (not a profit) because this will always be ploughed back into the business. Credit Unions, John Lewis and the Co- operative Bank are all examples of Co-operatives.

Social Enterprise

This also refers to a wide range of legal structures including most of the ones on this page!

Generally they describe any business model that trades to tackle social problems. They may make their money from selling goods and services in the open market, but they reinvest their "profits" back into the business or the local community. And so when they "profit", society "profits"

Voluntary/Community Group

A group whose members are volunteers and/or community members who have come together to deliver activities for the benefit of a community or groups within the community.

These groups do not have to have a legal structure but we would expect them to have an adequate Constitution and a suitable bank account.

Sports Club/Group

A Group or club whose primary aim is sports related. It may or may not have a paid membership scheme.

We would expect them to have an adequate Constitution and a suitable bank account.

Youth Club/Group

A Group or club are run by, or for the benefit of, young people. It may or may not have a paid membership scheme.

We would expect them to have an adequate Constitution and a suitable bank account.

School related e.g. PFTA

Schools (and curriculum based activities) are not eligible to the DDC Community grants as they receive government funding. However, schools often have Parent, Friends and Teachers Associations which are separate groups and support extra-curricula activity and family involvement with the school system. PFTA's can apply for a grant.

We would expect any PFTA's to be a separate organisation to the school with their own Constitution and a suitable bank account.

PFTA's will need to show clearly that the activity will have a wider community impact (beyond the school and its pupils) and that the activities funded by the grant would not normally (or otherwise) be part of the school curriculum.

Church/Faith groups

Churches and other charities and groups that are wholly or mainly for public religious worship.

We would expect them to have an adequate Constitution and a suitable bank account.

Part of [or related to] a larger organisation, Federation or National Charity

Many national Charities have regional or local branches. For example, The Scouts and Girl Guides. Some room is provided in the Application Form to provide further details.

Other

If you are none of the above please tick the 'other' box and use the space provided to describe your organisation.

 

 

If you are still unsure about which box/boxes you should tick on the application form, please contact us, email: CommunityGrants@dover.gov.uk.

 

PDF  Download our information pack - all of the information you need to apply

 

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Contact

email: CommunityGrants@dover.gov.uk.

 

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