Easing of National Lockdown restrictions | Visit our Coronavirus (COVID-19) section for information and support for residents and businesses. View Dover Districts latest Covid figures here.

Dover District’s latest COVID-19 figures

Number of cases for the seven days to

Rolling rate for the seven days to . England average is

Total cases (up to )

Total deaths within 28 days of a positive test (up to )

7-day rolling case rate compared to England average

Status: Below average (OR Above average if to the right of the dividing line)

Graphic results

All data sourced from coronavirus.data.gov.uk. Please see website for more information about the data and how it is calculated.

 

Advice and Information for Tenants

Do you rent or are you thinking of renting a property from a private landlord?

Before renting a property, you need to know what you can afford and have an understanding of the tenancy agreement which sets out the main terms of the tenancy, including the duration of the tenancy, the amount of rent and how often the rent can be increased.

Booklet: Do you rent or are you thinking of renting from a private landlord

 

Other useful information for tenants

  • Renting from a Social Landlord
    Social Rented housing is provided by Dover District Council and Housing Associations. It is allocated on the basis of need and the rent levels are usually lower than rents in the Private Rented sector. Due to the shortage of Social Rented Housing, you may have to wait to get a home.
  • What to do if you are homeless or about to be made homeless
    If you are being threatened with being made homeless or if you are homeless you need to contact the Housing Needs team immediately.
    - Do not leave it until the last minute to act.
    - Do not give up your home until you are legally obliged to do so (usually by court order) as this may damage any application for help that you make to this or any other council.
    For advice or to make a homeless application, you will need to come to the Gateway. You do not need an appointment for your first visit.
  • Repossession by your landlord's mortgage lender
    Advice for Tenants facing eviction because their landlord has mortgage arrears. 

 

 What does this mean for repairs and works in my home?

  Tradespeople can visit most people’s homes to carry out any work or maintenance provided it is carried out in accordance with guidance for professionals working in people’s homes and any advice on local measures that may be in place to prevent the transmission of coronavirus. Further

guidance on visits to properties to make repairs.

If tenants are not self-isolating, they can allow local authorities, landlords or contractors access to their home in order to carry out a range of works. This includes:

  • routine inspections, including annual gas safety checks;
  • essential and non-essential repairs and maintenance; and
  • planned maintenance activity inside and outside the home.

Services should be designed to ensure appropriate social distancing is maintained (insofar as possible) and hygiene procedures should be followed. Some landlords will have a backlog of repairs that they will need to address, so it may take longer than normal to carry out more non-essential work.

However, if they are self-isolating, no work should be carried out in a tenant’s home unless it is to remedy a direct risk that affects their safety or the safety of their household. These are issues which will affect their ability to live safely and maintain their mental and physical health in their home. In such cases, prior arrangements should be made to avoid any face to face contact, for example, when answering the door. Landlords and contractors should stay up to date with the latest guidance on working safely in people’s homes.

The shielding programme was paused on 1 August. Clinically extremely vulnerable groups or shielding households can now permit landlords and contractors to carry out routine repairs and inspections. Where repairs take place, it is important that the latest guidance on social distancing and working safely in people’s homes is followed.

Landlords should be aware that some tenants may still want to exercise caution and take this into account when engaging with their tenants. It is important that any work is carried out in accordance with the latest

guidance on working safely in people’s homes and guidance for individuals who were shielding.

Where restrictions are put in place in a specific local area, any local advice should also be observed. Unless specifically permitted, no work should be carried out in a tenants’ home unless it is to remedy a direct risk that affects their safety or the safety of their household.

Tenants must continue to meet their legal and contractual obligations as a tenant, including paying rent. Section 1 of this document provides guidance for those who are experiencing difficulties paying their rent.

2.2 I was shielding. Can I now let someone into my home for routine repairs and maintenance work?

Landlords and contractors can visit a tenants’ home to carry out any routine inspections or maintenance work (described at 3.1). It is important that this work is carried out in accordance with the latest

guidance on working safely in people’s homes and guidance for individuals who were shielding.

If tenants choose to allow tradespeople into their home, prior arrangements should be made to maintain appropriate social distancing during the visit. They can refer to the latest

guidance for individuals who were shielding.

See government

guidance on cleaning homes to minimise the risk of infection.

Local restrictions may also be in place and relevant local advice should also be observed.

Contact

Tel: 01304 872 397

Email: privatesectorhousing@dover.gov.uk